Fika is the student skills app, helping you build mental fitness and improve your emotional wellbeing. Check out these 5-minute brain workouts, drawn on scientific evidence to help you through self-isolation.

Nurturing your mental health is more important now we’re dealing with social isolation and the challenge of studying remotely. Remember, there’s no ‘right’ way of doing things. Prioritize keeping your mind active, engaged and try not to get overwhelmed. 

We’re all in this together, so never hesitate to reach out to someone you trust to speak to. Here are a few tricks to help you keep calm and carry on studying.

Fika is co-created with 1000s of students, psychologists and Olympic athletes to increase your motivation, sharpen your focus, boost your confidence, strengthen your relationships and make you better able to manage anxiety and stress.

Make a note of the things you’re grateful for each day. Doing this can increase your happiness by 10% – a good stat for times like this, we think. Even if it's just small things, the more positivity the better.

 

Strengthen relationships with phone or video calls. Make time to share in the things that make you laugh but also remember to make time for deeper conversations if you or your friends are feeling lonely or uncertain.

 

Stay on top of tasks. It’ll reduce stress in the short and long term Get started by making a list of everything you need to get done today and then focus on the most important thing (especially if that feels like the hardest one!). And if you’re struggling to stay focused, make ‘if-then’ plans for the things that derail you from achieving your goals. Think along the lines of, ‘If I get side-tracked watching TV then I’ll arrange an online study session with a friend so we can hold each other accountable’.

 

Laugh. It’s a brilliant way to boost your positivity and it has loads of health benefits. Why not take some time right now for something that really makes you laugh?

 

Thought admin. Not sure what that means? Well, when we spend lots of time on our own, it can be easy to start worrying about things that might happen in the future. In these instances, take a timeout to notice what your thoughts are, label them for what they are – ‘worry thoughts’. Then, let them pass like clouds drifting across the sky. It’ll help you return your attention to the ‘now’, as this is the only thing that you can control.

If you have any of your own hacks, let us know at @studenthutuk on Twitter!

 

 

 

 

 

Article by

Freya Hughes

Freya Hughes

Creative Copywriter